Get the Girl

March 21, 2017

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Glossy, noisy and a little bit dull, Get the Girl is the kind of the film you’d thought they’d stopped making
Get the Girl

Get the Girl

John Noonan
Year: 2017
Rating: MA15+
Director: Eric England
Cast:

Elizabeth Whitson, Justin Dobies, Noah Segan

Distributor: Bounty
Format:
DVD
Released: March 22, 2017
Running Time: 87 minutes
Worth: $7.00

FilmInk rates movies out of $20 — the score indicates the amount we believe a ticket to the movie to be worth

Glossy, noisy and a little bit dull, Get the Girl is the kind of the film you’d thought they’d stopped making…

Movies, particularly romantic comedies, often come under fire for normalising the idea that the key to a woman’s heart is persistence; even if they show next to no interest to begin with – or perhaps even have a boyfriend – eventually you can wear them down. After all, you’re the best.

Get the Girl, written and directed by Eric England (Contracted), takes that kind of cinematic stalking and turns up the volume as loud as it will go. Clarence (Justin Dobies) is a shy guy who just knows he’s perfect for bartender Alexandra (Elizabeth Whitson), she just doesn’t see it because she’s caught up in a messy divorce. In the hopes of swaying her to his way of thinking, Clarence concocts a plan with sleazy barfly Patrick (Noah Segan) to faux-kidnap Alexandra, allowing Clarence an opportunity to save her. Even when Alexandra gets the upper hand and kills one of her ‘kidnappers’ (actually a friend of Patrick) in self-defence, leading to the main thrust of the film’s plot, whichever way you cook it, it still leaves a bad taste at the back of the throat. And yes, the film is a comedy, but it’s not a particularly funny one with jokes very rarely hitting their mark.

Looks-wise the film is slick, and potentially there’s room to argue that Get the Girl is a deconstruction of ‘white knighting’; where the guy usually gets the girl by saving her. Flipping the coin and having the tale being told from Alexandra’s point of view would have probably lent the film more weight in this regard. However, whilst Patrick is shown up to be a toxic fool who kind of deserves the unravelling of his plan, Clarence is still the hero despite his stockpiling of terrible decisions. None of it rings true, and the film’s finale will have you picking your jaw up off the floor in disbelief.

Glossy, noisy and a little bit dull, Get the Girl is the kind of the film you’d thought they’d stopped making, but not in a good way.

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